Non-Fiction

War on Terror

650.00

The inside story – plans, strategies, casualties, letters – of the crackdown on terrorist groups by the Philippines military with the support of elite US Special forces, with no details spared. The War on Terror is a book about terrorism — the al-Qaeda, Jemaah Islamiyah and the Abu Sayyaf Group and their operations in southern Philippines — and includes photographs of letters written by terrorist commanders and by kidnapped American couple Martin and Gracia Burnham. The book follows the growth, movement and activities of the ASG, the Jemaah Islamiyah and the al-Qaeda and talks about how the military broke the triad of their operations through various operational plans and strategies that were implemented with the support of US Special Forces, whose actual involvement in counter-terrorism operations in the Philippines is being detailed for the first time. More than just about the issue of terrorism, the book will inform readers on the factors – social, political and economic that abet terrorism in a struggling country such as the Philippines.

Young Mongols: Forging Democracy In The Wild, Wild East

850.00

n 1990, Mongolia’s youth-led revolution threw off the Soviet yoke, ushering in multi¬party democracy. Thirty years later, the country’s youth are still leading Mongolia’s democratic development.

This powerful, inclusive book introduces readers to modern Mongolia through the stories of young leaders fighting to make their country a better, more democratic place. Its intersectional perspective explores the complexity of Mongolia today: the urban planning and pollution issues that plague the capital city of Ulaanbaatar; the struggles of women, the LGBTQIA+ population, people with disabilities, and ethnic minorities to claim their equitable places in society; the challenge of providing education in the world’s least densely populated country to prepare the workforce of tomorrow; and how to fairly divide the spoils of the country’s vast mineral resource wealth.

This rising generation of Mongolians is already wielding real power and shaping their country’s future. Their work will determine whether the country is able to overcome its development and democratization challenges, its relationship to the world, and who the winners (and losers) will be in Mongolian society.

How to Ride a Train to Ulaanbaatar and Other Essays

850.00

How to Ride a Train to Ulaanbaatar and Other Essays is a coming-of-age story of a woman who leaves home to work in Shanghai following the death of her mother. In a collection of ten travel essays, she writes about living in another culture to learn another language and the experiences that shaped her view on what it means to be her own person, a daughter, a friend, a lover and a citizen of the world.

About the Author

Josephine V. Roque is a freelance journalist and editor. She has worked in print and online publications in Manila and Shanghai. Joyce obtained her MFA in creative writing from De La Salle University and has received prizes for her essays from the Doreen Fernandez Food Writing Competition and Ateneo Art Awards. She also contributes art criticism and profiles for ArtAsiaPacific Magazine and ArtReview Asia.